Enabling Self-management
and Coping with Arthritic Pain
using Exercise

Evidence

ESCAPE-pain has a commitment to building a robust evidence base for our programme, since spreading into practice we have worked with delivery staff to ensure a database of clinical outcomes has been kept and updated on a regular basis.

The graphs below relay the pre intervention and post intervention outcome scores for the Knee OA Outcome Score (KOOS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMWBS) demonstrating ESCAPE-pain’s clinical effectiveness in practice, with a strong resemblance to what was found during the clinical trial (Hurley et al., 2007).

The graphs also show the percentages (%) of participants who showed an improvement in each outcomes score post intervention. The sample size of our database has reached over 2,500 participants to date and continues to grow.

 

Rigorous evaluation and independent review show ESCAPE-pain is:

  • safe and produces better clinical outcomes [Hurley et al 2007a, Hurley et al 2012]
    • reduces pain
    • improves physical function, general well-being and quality of life
    • reduces depression
  • has lower healthcare utilisation and cost savings
    • compared with usual outpatient physiotherapy
    • lower overall healthcare costs through reduced use of A&E services, medical consultations, referrals, investigations (i.e. X-rays and MRI scans)
    • reduced use of analgesia and gastro-protective agents, side effects of medication
  • is more cost-effective than usual care [Hurley et al 2007b, Hurley et al 2009]
  • may help delay or avoid surgery
  • promotes physical activity, reducing the risk of acquiring or exacerbating comorbidities such as diabetes and cardiovascular conditions
  • patients describe how first-hand, positive experience of the programme [Hurley et al 2010]
    • alters beliefs about the importance of exercise in managing their knee pain
    • allays fears that exercise might exacerbate joint pain and damage
    • helps them appreciate the benefits of exercise
    • become more confidence in their ability to use exercise as a self-management strategy
    • are less reliant on other people
  • clinicians adopt it as the intervention of choice for chronic joint pain [Hurley et al 2009]

 

Research Presentations

Clinical Outcomes (Hurley et al 2007a)

Clinical Outcomes (Hurley et al 2007a)

Long Term Outcomes (Hurley et al 2012)

Long Term Outcomes (Hurley et al 2012)

NICE QIPP Report

NICE QIPP Report

Patients Perspectives (Hurley et al 2010)

Patients Perspectives (Hurley et al 2010)

Economic Evaluation (Hurley et al 2007b)

Economic Evaluation (Hurley et al 2007b)

Exercise - Psychological Benefits (Hurley et al 2002)

Exercise - Psychological Benefits (Hurley et al 2002)

Hip Feasbility Trial (Hurley et al 2011)

Hip Feasbility Trial (Hurley et al 2011)